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Romanak, et al, 2019

Another publication independent of MyExposome or Oregon State research efforts.  Analysis of 77 compounds including brominated and chlorinated flame retardants, organophosphate esters, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in silicone wristbands used as personal passive samplers across 10 individuals.  The focus of this study was to show alternative cleanup and extraction methods to analyze the various compounds in wristbands accurately and repeatedly.

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Donald, et al, 2019

Chemical assessment of pollutants associated with artificial turf crumb rubber and surrounding air using silicone wristbands and polyethylene sampers. Partition coefficients were derived for silicone from polyethylene air sampling that could be used in future research to help calculate wristband data to air equivalent concentrations.

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Harley, et al: 2019

Determinants of pesticide concentrations in silicone wristbands worn by Latina adolescent girls in a California farmworker community: The COSECHA youth participatory action study.

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Ulrich et al: 2018

EPA’s non-targeted analysis collaborative trial (ENTACT): genesis, design, and initial findings. Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry validates use of silicone wristbands.

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Quintana, et al, 2019

Nicotine levels in silicone wristband samplers worn by children exposed to secondhand smoke and electronic cigarette vapor are highly correlated with child’s urinary cotinine, even after short periods such as 2 days.

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Dixon, et al, 2019

Assess differences and trends in personal chemical exposure from 14 communities in Africa (Senegal, South Africa), North America (United States (U.S.)) and South America (Peru) using 262 silicone wristbands analyzed for 1530 unique chemicals.  Found that 191 unique chemicals were detected, with 36 chemicals of various chemistries in common among geographical groups.

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Manzano, et al, 2019

Study that utilized nontargeted analysis methods with wristbands worn by 27 individuals in Chile.  Results indicated that wristbands could be used as a tool to identify and prioritize new exposures at the local and community level.  Over 500 individual compounds were tentatively identified in addition to 33 compounds that were routinely measured.

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Paulik, et al, 2018

Environmental and individual PAH exposures near rural natural gas extraction (using silicone wristbands and other passive samplers).  Wristband PAH data correlated with outdoor air samplers providing evidence that air monitoring efforts could be accomplished using wristband samplers in certain applications.

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Hammel et al: 2018

Evaluating the Use of Silicone Wristbands To Measure Personal Exposure to Brominated Flame Retardants. This study demonstrates that silicone wristbands can accurately detect personal PBDE exposures.

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Dixon et al., 2018

Publication examining and comparing PAHs found in wristbands, active sampling PUFs, and urinary derivatives in a 48-hr spot sample in a cohort of pregnant women in an Urban environment. More significant correlations between hydroxy-biomarkers in urine samples were found using wristband data than active PUF samples.  Partition coefficients were roughly estimated between silicone and PAHs, opening the door to new ways to back-calculate wristband data to air concentrations.

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Bergmann et al., 2018:

A publication reviewing development of a new quantitative screen for 1550 chemicals with GC-MS at Oregon State which we use in some of the wristband analytics.

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Aerts et al., 2018

Provides additional evidence that wristbands represent unique profiles of exposure over other traditional methods, and that the data collected is the result of more comprehensive source pathways of exposures than atmospheric sources alone.  Also expands analysis and modifies methodology from earlier work.  This group was independent of anyone from MyExposome or Oregon State. 

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Vidi et al., 2017

Examines DNA damage from hair follicles in children that are associated with agricultural households.  The wristbands were used to examine pesticides the children may have been exposed to and found unique exposures to a number of pesticides. 

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Bergmann et al., 2017:

Examines pesticides with agricultural communities in Peru and examines data in context with associated demographics in urban and rural environments. Demonstrates the use of wristbands as chemical samplers in remote environments.

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Anderson et al., 2017:

Adds to the fundamental research approach with other methods of preparing and analyzing the wristbands without solvents (i.e. thermal desorption), and provides transport and stability data for over 140 compounds of multiple chemistry classes.

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Kile et al. 2016:

Using the approach on a sensitive population with a new chemical category, flame retardants.  Compliance remained high even for small children.

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Donald et al., 2016:

Agricultural farm workers in Senegal are exposed to a wide range of pesticides, and the wristbands absorbed chemicals that would have been missed if demographic data (via surveys) was relied on exclusively.

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Hammel et al. 2016:

Comparing the technology to a more traditional method, hand wipes.  While both approaches had correlations with urinary metabolites of flame retardants, the wristbands were slightly more relevant to internal exposure under these study parameters.

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